Antibiotics are the first line of treatment in acute prostatitis (Cat. I). Antibiotics usually resolve acute prostatitis infections in a very short period of time. Appropriate antibiotics should be used, based on the microbe causing the infection. Some antibiotics have very poor penetration of the prostatic capsule, others, such as Ciprofloxacin, penetrate well. Severely ill patients may need hospitalization, while nontoxic patients can be treated at home with bed rest, analgesics, stool softeners, and hydration.

  1. Treatments vary among urologists and are tailored to the type of prostatitis you have. Correct diagnosis is crucial and treatments vary. It's important to make sure your symptoms are not caused by urethritis (inflammation of the urethra) or some other condition that may lead to permanent bladder or kidney damage.
  2. Treatments can include:
  3. Anti-inflammatory medicines along with warm sitz baths (sitting in two to three inches of warm water). This is the most conservative treatment for chronic prostatitis.
  4. Antibiotic medicine for infectious prostatitis. These medicines are not effective treatments for noninfectious prostatitis. For acute infectious prostatitis, patients usually need to take antibiotic medicine for 14 days. Almost all acute infections can be cured with this treatment.
  5. For chronic infectious prostatitis, antibiotic medicine is taken for a longer period of time, usually four to 12 weeks. About 75% of all cases of chronic infectious prostatitis clear up with this treatment. For cases that don't, taking antibiotics at a low dose for a long time may be recommended to relieve the symptoms.
  6. Pain medications.
  7. Muscle relaxants.
  8. Surgical removal of the infected portions of the prostate. A doctor may advise this treatment for severe cases of chronic prostatitis or for men whose swollen prostate is blocking the flow of urine.
  9. Supportive therapies for chronic prostatitis, including stool softeners and prostate massage.