TreatmentsforSchizophrenia

Posted on December 13, 2006, in Uncategorized, with 0 Comments

Since schizophrenia may not be a single condition and its causes are not yet known, current treatment methods are based on both clinical research and experience. These approaches are chosen on the basis of their ability to reduce the symptoms of schizophrenia and to lessen the chances that symptoms will return.

  1. Antipsychotic medicines help to control schizophrenia. There are two main classes of medicines: the older antipsychotic medicines, which until recently were standard treatment, and the newer "atypical" antipsychotics.
  2. The older medicines include chlorpromazine (Largactil), flupenthixol (Depixol), fluphenazine (Moditen) and pimozide (Orap). Side-effects commonly caused by this type of medication include muscle stiffness, tremor and restlessness. Certain side-effects from some antipsychotic drugs may be irreversible, even when medication is stopped. Some people with schizophrenia have weekly or two-weekly injections of their medication (depot injection), so that they do not need to remember to take daily tablets.
  3. Newer types of medication have been developed which do not have the same side-effects as conventional treatment, making them more acceptable to people taking them long term. These are known as "atypical antipsychotics" and include clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa) , risperidone (Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel) and amisulpride (Solian). Current evidence is that they are as effective as the older treatments but may cause troublesome weight-gain.

TreatmentsforSchizophrenia

Posted on December 13, 2006, in Uncategorized, with 0 Comments

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects the way the brain processes outside stimuli. If you are suffering from schizophrenia, you will not see or understand things in the same way that an unaffected person does.

  1. The symptoms of schizophrenia are numerous and debilitating. Most schizophrenics will suffer from symptoms throughout their lives, though there can be periods where symptoms are absent. Schizophrenia symptoms are divided into three categories: positive symptoms, disorganized symptoms, and negative symptoms.
  2. Positive Symptoms: Positive symptoms of schizophrenia are those symptoms that involve an excess of normal bodily functions.
  3. For instance, if you are schizophrenic your senses may operate at a heightened and excessive state. Positive signs of schizophrenia include delusions, or beliefs that have no basis in reality. You may feel persecuted (paranoid delusions), you may feel as if the television or radio is talking directly to you (delusions of references), you may hold false beliefs about your physical state (somatic delusions) or you may feel that you have special abilities or powers (delusions of grandeur).
  4. Many schizophrenics also experience hallucinations due to overactive senses. You may see things that aren’t really there, you
  5. may hear people talking to you, and you may even be able to smell, touch, and taste things that other people can’t. These
  6. hallucinations may be quite scary for both the schizophrenic and for family and friends.
  7. Disorganized Symptoms: Disorganized symptoms are those symptoms that exhibit the confusion caused within the brain. Often, a
  8. schizophrenic will have trouble maintaining a conversation, may engage in unpredictable behaviors, or may act bizarrely in certain situations. People with schizophrenia also have difficulty achieving goals or acting with any purpose. For example, schizophrenics may hold unusual poses for extended periods of time.
  9. Negative Symptoms: These include a lack of energy, social withdrawal and lack of motivation. The person affected may say very
  10. little, find social contacts difficult and may have difficulty getting out of bed. Often, carers find negative symptoms frustrating, perceiving a person with schizophrenia as lazy. In fact, these symptoms are part of the illness.

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